Wheels ban possible for Barrett

Freshman management major Raquel Thosesen locks up her bike after riding into the Barrett corridors in Tempe on Monday. Barrett Deans have threatened to ban bikes in the complex or station security guards at entrances if the Walk Your Wheels mandate is not obeyed. (Photo by Perla Farias)

Management freshman Raquel Thosesen locks up her bike after riding into the Barrett, the Honors College corridors in Tempe on Monday. Barrett Deans have threatened to ban bikes in the complex or station security guards at entrances if the Walk Your Wheels mandate is not obeyed. (Photo by Perla Farias)

 

Barrett, the Honors College students may face a full bike and skateboard ban because of failure to comply with a campus-wide Walk Your Wheels mandate, according to an email sent from dean Mark Jacobs on Nov. 30.

The full ban of wheeled transportation is one of three options Barrett administration is considering, according to the email. The other options include having a police officer stationed inside the Barrett complex or installing barriers around heavily trafficked areas of the campus.

Honors college spokeswoman Nicole Greason said in an email that the college is exploring the most reasonable solution to the problem.

“At Barrett Honors College, we strive to promote this campaign and ask that students, staff and faculty help to make our residential campus community as safe as possible by complying with the measures outlined in Walk Your Wheels,” Greason said.

Several incidents, including near misses between students on wheeled transportation and pedestrians, have occurred since the campaign started, according to notices posted around the academic complex by the Barrett administration beginning in November.

“We have notified the Barrett community about Walk Your Wheels and will pursue any reasonable action to keep the Barrett campus safe and accident-free,” Greason said.

Throughout the school year, many students ride their bikes and skateboards within the Barrett complex and around the campus. In August 2011, the Tempe Undergraduate Student Government enacted the Walk Your Wheels campaign to encourage students to dismount from their wheeled transport in crowded areas.

USG spokeswoman Audree Lopez said she does not understand how moving the bike racks outside of Barrett will solve the problem.

“I don’t think it’s possible because there are so many students,” she said.

Lopez said she enjoys the security provided by the bike racks within the college, which prevents theft.

“As a Barrett student, I like having a safe community,” she said.

Tempe USG President Mark Naufel said the Barrett administration’s decision will not affect the rest of the campus.

Naufel was surprised to hear that Barrett was discussing the removal of bike racks. However, he said he supports transferring the bike racks outside of the complex grounds.

Naufel said the only discussion for a campus-wide change regarding wheeled transportation is the possible addition of bike lanes around campus.

Lopez said that a decision on the bike lane proposal should be reached in either March or April.

There are also plans to add new, more secure bike racks in approximately two or three years, he said.

The notice of the ban has not been a cause for concern for biochemistry freshman Caraline Sepich, who said she regularly complies with the request of the Walk Your Wheels signs.

“It wasn’t a big deal to me,” she said. “I normally hop off my bike before going in (to Barrett) anyway.”

Sepich said the warning from the dean was discomforting, but she was grateful that the administration has not resorted to drastic measures yet.

Music therapy major Leslie Sato said although the campaign is inconvenient at times, it creates a safer campus.

“I guess it’s an inconvenience,” Sato said. “But it’s better for everyone in the long run.”

 

Reach the reporter at laura.m.davis@asu.edu or follow her on Twitter @LauraChelle