Reflective Portals

Photo by Mackenzie McCreary

Stained glass panels decorate the windowed walls of the above-ground wing of Hayden Library.
Photo by Mackenzie McCreary

A lot of people don’t like windows.

Some people see them as impossibly clear panes of glass that only let them observe and not experience.

But windows have always fascinated me.

While taking a few of these photos in bright mid-day sunshine, I was fascinated by the infinitum that comes from them during that time.

The way they let us see what’s on the other side while simultaneously reflecting what’s on our side is something I like to ponder: seeing two sides of something at once.

The windows of the tower on Hayden Lawn both reflect the surrounding trees and look out on the solar panels and buildings. Photo by Mackenzie McCreary

The windows of the tower on Hayden Lawn both reflect the surrounding trees and look out on the solar panels and buildings.
Photo by Mackenzie McCreary

I’m sure I’m not the only one who passes a window and checks my hair before peering into whatever storefront or restaurant hosting the double-use mirror.

It took a couple days for me to realize the triceratops statue on the other side of the window of the Interdisciplinary Science and Technology IV Building that I pass every other day.

A triceratops statue grins as students pass the Interdisciplinary Science and Technology IV Building. Photo by Mackenzie McCreary

A triceratops statue grins as students pass the Interdisciplinary Science and Technology IV Building.
Photo by Mackenzie McCreary

As the day slowly passes by, the sun moves across the sky and the reflections shift their images across the glass.
And then, when night falls and we retreat back to our personal places of comfort, they become portals into things that we rarely see in the glare of the sun. A light left on in the quiet darkness of evening never fails to intrigue me.

An office light brightly burns as the sky darkens with the sinking of the sun between the palm trees.  Photo by Mackenzie McCreary

An office light brightly burns as the sky darkens with the sinking of the sun between the palm trees.
Photo by Mackenzie McCreary

What is keeping that person awake? What is happening behind that window?

I can never stop my brain from creating stories of what might be happening behind those framed panes. What I come up with serves as a constant source of inspiration and mystery that keeps me company when I don’t have a book with me.

A science-themed holiday tree decorates the labs of the Interdisciplinary Science and Technology IV Building among diagrams, wires and other experiment essentials. Photo by Mackenzie McCreary

A science-themed holiday tree decorates the labs of the Interdisciplinary Science and Technology IV Building among diagrams, wires and other experiment essentials.
Photo by Mackenzie McCreary

The windows across ASU are no exception.

I like to wonder what’s going through the mind of the director who rules over all those colorful buttons in the studio production room. I wonder what piece of music the boy with the trombone is practicing, and what he may be practicing for. I wonder if the game of Tetris will ever be finished.

Peering both at and through windows has become a hobby of mine and it never fails to captivate me.

Buttons and screens continue to light up the darkened studio production room as the First Amendment reminds journalism students of their civil rights on the sixth floor of the Walter Cronkite. Photo by Mackenzie McCreary

Buttons and screens continue to light up the darkened studio production room as the First Amendment reminds journalism students of their civil rights on the sixth floor of the Walter Cronkite.
Photo by Mackenzie McCreary

A student practices his trombone in the individual practice-rooms of the Music Building. Photo by Mackenzie McCreary

A student practices his trombone in the individual practice-rooms of the Music Building.
Photo by Mackenzie McCreary

A perpetual game of Tetris is in play with sticky notes on a window of Hayden Hall. Dorm-room windows are a crucial outlet of expression for many students.  Photo by Mackenzie McCreary

A perpetual game of Tetris is in play with sticky notes on a window of Hayden Hall. Dorm-room windows are a crucial outlet of expression for many students.
Photo by Mackenzie McCreary

A piano stands boldly in one of the practice-rooms of the Music Building, waiting for fingers to grace its ivory keys. Photo by Mackenzie McCreary

A piano stands boldly in one of the practice-rooms of the Music Building, waiting for fingers to grace its ivory keys.
Photo by Mackenzie McCreary

The Computing Commons of the Coor Building reflects its windowed walls in the various screens of its unused computers on a Friday night. Photo by Mackenzie McCreary

The Computing Commons of the Coor Building reflects its windowed walls in the various screens of its unused computers on a Friday night.
Photo by Mackenzie McCreary

An unused book-return panel guards the windows of Hayden Library. Photo by Mackenzie McCreary

An unused book-return panel guards the windows of Hayden Library.
Photo by Mackenzie McCreary

As students board the intercampus shuttle everyone tries to get a seat by the window to watch the city pass for the 30-minute ride.  Photo by Mackenzie McCreary

As students board the intercampus shuttle, everyone tries to get a seat by the window to watch the city pass for the 30-minute ride.
Photo by Mackenzie McCreary

 

Reach the writer at mamccrea@asu.edu or via Twitter @Mackenziemicro