‘Anatomy of a Single Girl’ explores college life, big decisions

Pitchforks: 3/5

 

Going back home during summer break after your first year of college can be an exciting and altogether stressful time. It’s that awkward time where you’re ready to tell the world (and your parents) that you are capable of making those big decisions: when your curfew will be, how you will spend your time and if it’s time for you to have sex.

In “Anatomy of a Single Girl” a novel by Daria Snadowsky, Dominique leaves Tulane to head back to Fort Myers, Fla., where she is ready to relax with her best friend Amy and have a break from the demands of her pre-med major.

Trying to decide if she has feelings for one of her friends at school, Dominique is quick to forget about him when her world collides with Guy. The dynamic of their relationship is more complicated than she hoped and leads to sexual escapades that she wasn’t planning on happening.

The beginning lays the foundation for the rest of the book and can take some time to get engaged in, but once Guy starts to transform Dominique’s life you almost have to force yourself to stop flipping the pages.

While trying to balance her internship, her newfound relationship and making time to hangout with her friend Amy, Dominique also has to deal with trying to make decisions for herself and pleasing her parents.

After her parents drop news on Dominique that will alter the rest of her life, she finds herself becoming more and more irritated with them, making it easier for her to forget about their weekend fishing trips.

To top off her already crazy summer, Dominique and Amy have a falling out that she never expected. Dominique learns the hard way that it’s not always worth it to put boyfriends before your best friend.

Not knowing how her life took such drastic turns, Dominique tries to pick up the pieces and make the most of her last couple weeks of summer vacation.

“Anatomy of a Single Girl” hits on many of the issues that college students face once returning home from college, making it a relatable read.

That time of growing up, making discoveries about yourself and realizing what is important in life is the beginning of a new chapter in a young adult’s life and Snadowsky captures these moments through Dominique.

At times, the tone of the book takes a juvenile turn, and it can feel a bit like you’re reading about the events of high schooler, but then it jumps to a sex scene full of orgasms, reminding you these are the events unfolding in a soon-to-be college sophomore’s life.

Following Dominique through her summer and breaking out of her shell helps readers remember that you can’t always control situations, but it’s best to make the most of them.

“Anatomy of a Single Girl” can be purchased on Amazon.

 

Reach the reporter at nrmirand@asu.edu or follow on Twitter @natalieroxann