New penalties implemented in Walk-Only Zones

A mall enforcement officer writes in his ticket book while speaking to a stopped bicyclist. First time offenders will be given a warning while second-time offenders will be required to pay a $15 fee and attend a bicycle safety class. (Photo by Andrew Ybanez)

A campus mall enforcement officer writes in his ticket book while speaking to a stopped bicyclist. First time offenders will be given a warning while second-time offenders will be required to pay a $15 fee and attend a bicycle safety class. (Photo by Andrew Ybanez)

Formal Walk-Only Zone enforcement and penalty implementations have started to take effect with the objective to ensure campus safety.

The new rules started to take effect in the beginning of April.

 

First time offenders will be given a ticket, while second time offenders will be forced to pay a $15 fee in cash or orders payable to the ASU Police Department. They also must attend an ASU Police Department bicycle safety class.

 

 

The classes cover traffic and bicycle laws that bicyclists have to obey. Classes are held at the ASU Police Department from 3 to 5 p.m on select Mondays and Thursdays. The class can last anywhere from 90 minutes to two hours.

 

ASU faculty and staff who drive ASU vehicles such as motorized carts are required to complete a Driving on the Mall class. Those who violate zones by driving ASU vehicles on Walk-Only Zones must take the class again. They do not have to pay a fee.

 

Third time offenders will receive a referral to the dean of students or vice president.

 

Walk-Only ambassador Mithun Chandra Mohan said these rules were implemented to ensure safety of students commuting to classes.

 

“We’ve had at least three incidences a week with people getting hurt,” he said.

 

ASU isn’t the first school to establish walk-only zones on campus. More than 25 other U.S. colleges have implemented similar safety zones.

 

Although the penalties were implemented to ensure safety, it has caused discontent among students.

Design studies junior Brandon Camino said thought the penalties were going too far.

“I just saw a girl get a ticket for it last week,” he said. “I think it’s stupid, because the areas where they put the zones are the best place to skateboard, and it’s really inconvenient to have to take detours.”

Other students think it is the responsibility of students to make sure they stay safe when commuting to class.

Art freshman Erin Riley said college students are adults and shouldn’t need safety zones.

“Getting to class on time is very important, and these rules make it very inconvenient for some people,” she said.

Reach the reporter at kgrega@asu.edu or follow her on Twitter @kelciegrega