ASU me3 app expands to over 100,000 users

ASU developers' me3 app is available on Google Play and Apple store

Instead of using a paper and pencil for a career test, a team of developers from EdPlus created a unique and modern approach to help students decide on a future career path.

From 2015 to now, over 100,000 users have downloaded Arizona State University’s career tool app called me3. Me3 is a picture-based game for ages 13 and older to help aid students, teachers and parents plan for the future. 

The app is intended to motivate children from a young age to prepare themselves for college while promoting ASU’s higher education programs. ASU students can also use the app to find out what major or career best suits their interests.


EdPlus’ team has used the me3 app as a way to reach out to students struggling with choosing a future career path during their time spent at ASU. The app is designed to help those students align their major choice with their interests.

Lisa Flesher the ASU director of strategic initiatives at EdPlus discussed the positive and negative aspects of the me3 app throughout its development. 

“For positive aspects of the app, we’ve heard a lot across the board that students love that ability to explore with careers that may have not crossed their mind,” Flesher says. 

She says the image nature of the app attracts a wide population from ages 13 and up. 

“A lot of other tools on the market have a lot of questions," Flesher says. "The image nature of me3 has seemed to connect well with this population."

Flesher says some negative feedback she received was centered around the topic of photo diversity. 

"The photo diversity has come up a lot, so we worked really hard in the past year by refining and adding these photos by representing a diverse population across all the photos,” she says.

Flesher continued to elaborate on the marketing aspects of the me3 app that draw in consumers across the board. 

“For students, really just the image based nature sort of draws people in on its own," Flesher says. "The teacher’s really like that there’s a tool that gives them guidance for college. We haven’t done extensive marketing, so it’s something we’re really focusing on a lot this year. 

Flesher says in 2018, EdPlus will shift their marketing focus. 

"Initially it's been partnerships with ASU, but in 2018 we’ll start to shift to see how we can start to do some targeted marketing towards various audiences."

Flesher added that this upcoming 2018 year there will be a lot of marketing ideas to help the app further market, expand, and grow. 

"The first version of me3 was a website that had PDFs, and there was no way it was ever going to resonate with high school students," Flesher says. "So, we consulted with an outside company to add engagement and created an image based game. We adapted the tool so that it was applicable to ASU students. We’ve had so much progression since 2015, and want to keep it relevant and keep users engaged.”

Leah Lommel the chief operating officer for EdPlus discussed why the ASU me3 app is effective in engaging with students ranging from high school to college ages. 

“I think the big thing is that ASU is continually looking for ways for people to explore their potential and recognize a path,” Lommel says. “Many times what you see in other career assessment tools is that they are very wordy ... ASU is continually looking for ways to help people prepare and look for options to get through higher education, get a degree, and recognize all their career potential.”


Sylvia Symonds the assistant vice president with Educational Outreach and Student Services at ASU discussed the initial testing as well as the different roles of ASU researchers in developing the me3 app. 

“Our me3 team did a lot of testing with students and counselors to ensure that the tool would be relevant, engaging and useful for our audience," Symonds says. "We had to determine the number of images to use, the look and feel of the tool, as well as the Euclidean distance matching algorithm that connects the images to careers." 

Symonds' says EdPlus had help from several other ASU student service outlets. 

"Experts from across the university, including EdPlus, Admissions, Career and Professional Development Services, the Provost’s Office and Educational Outreach and Students Services played key roles in the development of me3,” she says.

Symonds expressed her excitement for the me3 app’s measurable success by it being available on Google Play and Apple store as well as the accessibility of the mobile version interface. 

“Students can easily access me3 on their phones and utilize it to create a plan to achieve their higher education goals," Symonds says. "Me3 is one tool ASU has developed to ensure that we are measured by who we include and how they succeed. The more college readiness information students and families have, the more prepared they will be to achieve their higher education goals.” 

Freshman Makenna Lewis majoring in philosophy described her experience with using the me3 app while being a first-year college student.

"The app seems geared more towards prospective students rather than those who are pretty firm in what they want to do with their time," Lewis says. "The game is decently fun and quick, which is a bonus and it actually set me up with some careers I have considered before, so it has some accuracy."

She says the app serves as a resource for students deciding on college for their future. 

"It's a niche resource for those who need to know what they're getting into and the app is capable of helping people decide whether college is right for them," Lewis says. "Also, it gives information to find resources regarding financial aid."


Reach the reporter at Ashlee.Thomason@asu.edu or follow @ThomasonAshlee on Twitter.

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