Research Roundup: Magnetic moon lava, bad wifi and biodesign advancements

ASU's research and State Press reports from the last week

This week in ASU Research 

Magma Moon Magnetics 

ASU researchers have developed a new theory as to how the moon maintained such a strong magnetic field, even with a small radius. The team, consisting of Scientist Aaron Scheinberg of Princeton with Krista Soderlund from the University of Texas Institute for Geophysics and Lindy Elkins-Tanton of Arizona State University, have proposed that a heavy layer of molten rock sat on top of the moon’s metal core and created the earth’s magnetic field. The convection in this layer of rock’s magma ocean created the magnetic field. 

This week from The State Press Science and Tech desk: 

You might be causing ASU's bad Wi-Fi

Erick Fowler

"ASU wifi is known for having a few glitches." Graphic published on Thursday, April 19, 2018.



Relevant quote: “The basic problem is that wireless routers, printers, gaming controllers — all of those things operate on the same frequencies as the ASU network. So what happens from the resident’s perspective is your computer is trying to connect to the ASU access point, but the data packets are being interrupted from accomplishing their transmission.” — Stephen Quick, systems support analyst for ASUP University Housing.


ASU's Ask a Biologist has answered science questions for more than 20 years

Isabel Han

ASU professor and creator of the "Ask a Biologist" site Charles Kazilek poses for a photo in Tempe, Arizona, on Friday, April 20, 2018.



Relevant quote: “We are storytellers. That's what's important. If you don't tell a good story, it's hard to keep people interested — that's for any discipline — so we're storytellers.” — Charles Kazilek, creator of Ask A Biologist and chief technology innovation officer at ASU.


ASU teams up with NASA to create interactive space exploration lessons 

Chris Scragg

Two people walk through the Interdisciplinary Science and Technology Building IV in Tempe, Arizona, on Wednesday, April 25, 2018. 



Relevant quote: "Students get really enthusiastic and excited about playing a game in class. It’s something different that they don’t normally do in class or for homework ... it engages their senses in more meaningful ways." – Joseph Tamer, assistant director of the Center for Education Through eXploration.


What we saw at the Biodesign Institute's latest media day

Sabine Galvis

Qiang "Shawn" Chen talks about how the Biodesign Institute grows tobacco plants to develop drugs at the Biodesign Institute in Tempe, Arizona on Friday, April 20, 2018.



Reach the reporter at maatenci@asu.edu or follow @mitchellatencio on Twitter.

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