Research Roundup: Adolescent deviancy, preventing cyberattacks and more

ASU's research and The State Press reports from the last week

This week in ASU research news:

Family and friends during childhood can have long-term impact on adults in romantic relationships

In a new study published in "Developmental Psychology" on Oct. 29, ASU researchers shared how vulgar teenage conversations with peers and undisciplined parenting can lead to antisocial behavior, substance abuse and unhealthy relationships in adulthood.

This long-form study has been in the works for the last 20 years and was accomplished by following the lives of 230 participants from the time they were 11 to 12 years old up until they were between 28 to 30 years old.

The study concluded that the long-term effects of those who experienced reinforcement of inappropriate behavior or conversation, dubbed as "deviancy training," were more likely to display coercive behavior in their romantic relationships as adults.  

Research team develops artificial intelligence system to predict if a business will be targeted by cyberattacks

ASU researchers, as part of an international cybersecurity research team, took part in the creation of DARKMENTION, a new detailed system created to predict major cyber attacks on large businesses through analyzing discussions on the deep/dark web.

The system deciphers the possibility of future cyber threats, generates warnings and submits the threats to a security operations center. DARKMENTION collects data from over 400 platforms and then machine learning models filter the data to remove irrelevant information.

This week from the science and technology desk:

What is the best way to avoid getting sick during flu season?


Heather Brumfield

"Don't be blue, get the flu... vaccine." Illustration published on Thursday, Oct. 5, 2017.


XOFLUZA, a new anti-flu medication that can be given to those already infected with the flu, was recently approved by the FDA. Although post-infected flu medications like Tamiflu and XOFLUZA exist, ASU health professionals stress the importance of students getting the flu vaccine and taking preventive measures to not get sick. 

Relevant quote: "Prevention is always better than treatment." – Dr. Stephanie Schroeder, chief of medical staff at ASU Health Services.

Sunhacks provides an inclusive outlet for ASU students


Maya Shrikant

ASU students Alli DiNapoli, Momen Abdelkarim and Frank Liu pose for a photo on ASU's Tempe campus on Friday, Oct. 26, 2018.


Sunhacks is ASU's largest student-run hackathon. On Nov. 9, students will gather for a 36-hour long hackathon in an environment that is committed to emphasizing community, inclusivity and growth.

Relevant quotes: "The culture is very fragmented at ASU, so it’s very difficult to make a community on campus. We want to provide a framework where people can get together, grow together, learn together and have a lot of fun.” – Frank Liu, a doctorate student studying computer engineering and the marketing organizer for Sunhacks. 


Reach the reporter at jlmyer10@asu.edu or follow @jessiemy94 on Twitter. 

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