Politics Weekly Roundup: From Sinclair to the Arizona Supreme Court

A look back at the week's reporting

Welcome to the ninth installment of The State Press Politics Roundup, where we bring you the week's coverage of on-campus and local politics.

This week, reporters spoke to DACA recipients who learned they will no longer be eligible for in-state tuition after the Arizona Supreme Court upheld a lower court's ruling. They also spoke to the deans of ASU's Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication about their recent condemnation of Sinclair Broadcast Group.

If you missed the last roundup, catch yourself up here.

In recent USG and campus news:

Out with the old and in with the new

Newly elected USG leadership sat in, shadowing in meetings and learning the inner-workings of student government. For many, it was review, but was a necessary part of the transition process. This comes as each campus  student government begins its search for other student workers to fill vacant positions. The new class of elected leadership will begin their term next fall semester.

USGT to host sexual violence support event

Undergraduate Student Government Tempe will host a work shop to educate students  about how to support victims of sexual violence and strengthening their sense of empathy and support skills. The workshop is aimed at sexual  violence victims and their friends. The event will be held at the Memorial Union in the Senita Ballroom on Arpil 23 at 5:00 p.m.

The week's reporting

Arizona Supreme Court rules DACA recipients cannot receive in-state tuition



The Arizona Supreme Court ruled that Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals recipients are ineligible for in-state tuition last week, upholding a lower court's ruling. DACA students responded shortly after, saying the decision may force them to leave ASU, while University officials said the school will continue to support the group to the fullest legal extent. Read more here.



Cronkite continues recruiting relationship with Sinclair despite protests from students, alumni

Jesse Stawnyczy
Dean Christopher Callahan of the Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication speaks to members of the Blaze radio station before an interview on Wednesday, Nov. 16, 2016.



Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication Dean Christopher Callahan responded to the recent controversy surrounding Sinclair Broadcast Group, saying the school has "deep concerns" about its operations, but will continue to allow them to recruit students. The announcement came two days after the school signed onto a letter condemning Sinclair.

Students and alumni voiced disappointment with his statement, which they felt was not strong enough. Read more here.



Weeks after Uber fatality, ASU, Waymo continue testing on self-driving cars

Hannah Franklin

Illustration published on Wednesday, April 11, 2018.



Last month a Tempe woman was killed by an Uber-branded autonomous vehicle, the first fatality involving a self-driving car, prompting Gov. Doug Ducey to revoke the company's testing privileges. Despite the stigma and setback, ASU researchers said they remain committed to testing the technology and paving the path for what they see as the future of transportation. Read more here.



Students join nationwide effort for millennial voter registration

Reilly Kneedler

Students and cars pass by signs advertising the polling location in the Sun Devil Fitness Complex on the ASU Tempe campus on Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2016. 



Organizations across the state are increasing voting registration outreach efforts ahead of the upcoming midterm elections. Groups like NextGen America are targeting college students in particular and anticipate a high turnout. Read more here.


Reach the reporter at Anicla@asu.edu or follow @AndrewNicla on Twitter. 

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