'de.lineation' opens at Herberger’s Gallery 100

This large scale piece was made by all four artists and titled "Collaboration". (Photo by Aubrey Rumore) This large scale piece was made by all four artists and titled "Collaboration". (Photo by Aubrey Rumore)

Delineation is the action of portraying something precisely; drawing is, as these artists portray, one of the most direct, natural forms of self-expression.

"'de.lineation' is aptly named in that all four artists use lines in a variety of ways to visually describe the goings on of their minds,” director of ASU Student Galleries Peter Bugg said. “The works in the show are large and small, intimate and grandiose, monochromatic and bursting at the seams with color. No matter your taste, there is certain to be something for everyone to enjoy."

Four unique artists, all with very contrasting, bold works, are on display with the only similarity being the art form: drawing. Along with four sets of individual work, the exhibit also features one large-scale project titled “Collaboration” in which all the artists combined their styles to make one fluid piece. Paint pen, charcoal, Prismacolor and ink were the mediums the artists used.

Amberlyn Williams's work features a series of unique, detailed insects. (Photo by Aubrey Rumore) Amberlyn Williams's work features a series of unique, detailed insects. (Photo by Aubrey Rumore)

Across from the group piece is a partition showcasing work by drawing senior Sydney Acree. Acree’s labyrinth-style pieces are made with Prismacolor pencils and paint markers. These works are mounted on black paper and framed in black, making the patterns and colors as radiant as possible. In all of her work, human features like eyes and faces are embedded in the designs.

The work is, in a word, vibrant, in both style and color. Her designs grab eyes and swirl them across the pieces.

Drawing senior Daisy Jasmine Rue described her art simply as “me.” Her works, mostly done in the charcoal and graphite mediums, reflected her personal style as she stood in front of her pieces in a studded leather jacket, bright blue eyeliner and dots by the corners of her eyes.

"There’s no real theme with my art, just ideas flying around in my head," she said. "They are all personal in some way."

After graduating from ASU, Rue plans on heading straight to New York to pursue a dream as bold as her art.

A visitor observes the work of Amberlyn Williams which includes many insects hanging on wires. (Photo by Aubrey Rumore) A visitor observes the work of Amberlyn Williams which includes many insects hanging on wires. (Photo by Aubrey Rumore)

“I want to get my MFA and then go to culinary school and use my creativity to be a chef,” Rue said.

Drawing senior Joshua Mayers's creativity was first sparked by his pet bird when he was younger.

“I would put the bird on my shoulder and walk around with it all day,” he said.

Since then, the animal has influenced his work.

“I’m really attached to them; the bird is memorable to me,” he said, adding that he admires the gentle way of birds as well as the beautiful detail in their feathers.

In each of Mayers's works, a bird appears as a pleasant surprise, distinctly realistic and detailed. Quirky and clever, one of Mayers's pieces depicts a role reversal with two owls in suits, standing in a study and, to add even more of a twist, Mayers's head is mounted on the wall. Another similar piece is a scene of distinguished birds, again personified as humans with business attire and human-shaped bodies, all grouped around a cage. The cage encloses the artist as the solemn party's pet.

Aside from sprinkling his art with birds, his style is made up of many smooth, clean lines, with the phrase “art comes from the heart” in block letters across one of his pieces.

A piece titled "Abled" by Daisy Jasmine Rue. (Photo by Aubrey Rumore) A piece titled "Abled" by Daisy Jasmine Rue. (Photo by Aubrey Rumore)

The fourth artist featured has her work hanging from five rows of wires. Like clothes hanging out to dry, drawing senior Amberlyn Williams’s work features over 20 crisp, ink-made insects as well as a three beautiful human body sketches. All of the pages had a unique insect, drawn as delicate as the body of a butterfly, moth, cicada or lady bug.

Her medium — a combination of ink and water — made for a very unique color scheme and effect, letting her capture even the reflection on the insect's bodies.

The artists all exemplify themselves through their work and exhibit the tedious technique of drawing.

"My interest in science is inextricably bound to my art-making. As I observe, I am captivated by the smallest details, each so wonderfully complex and essential," Williams said in her thank you note posted to the wall of the gallery.

The group exhibit will be open until Friday at Gallery 100 on the Tempe campus.

Gallery 100 Details:

951 S. Mill Ave., Tempe

Monday – Thursday: Noon – 5 p.m.

Fridays: Noon – 3 p.m.

 

Reach the reporter at aerumore@asu.edu or follow her on Twitter @AubreyElleR

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